Lectus



  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Èanna-Heavey-Image-Lectus-960-400-1.jpg

MART are delighted to present Lectus, a visual arts exhibition featuring Èanna Heavey, Emma McKeagney and Sarah Diviney and curated by Deirdre Morrissey opening 10th January at 6pm in The MART Gallery Rathmines.

Preview: 10th January @ 6pm
Location: The MART Gallery, 190A Rathmines Road Lower, Dublin 6
Runs to: 10th Jan – 14th February
Open: Open Tues – Sat: 1pm – 6pm

Facebook Event: Link to Facebook Event Opening

The MART Gallery are delighted to announce the winners of our annual MART Exhibition Award: Èanna Heavey and Sarah Diviney from the 2018 CIT Crawford College of Art & Design Fine Art Graduate exhibition and Emma McKeagney from Fire Station Artists’ Studios 2018 Sculpture Bursary Award. The aim of this award is to provide a showcase and supported exhibition opportunity to emerging artists whose work is both engaging and experimental.

The artwork presented is a selection of sculptural forms, video work and live performance. Emma McKeagney’s beautiful sculptural objects are presented alongside new video work that further explores the materiality of natural and designed forms. Sarah Diviney’s moving performative work reflects Ireland’s state institutional treatment of women, many of whose fate was sealed due to the woeful lack of sexual education in Irish society as referenced in Èanna Heavey’s powerful and unsettling video piece ‘I’m sorry I was not here..’.

The exhibition is kindly supported by CIT Crawford College of Art & Design, Cork and Fire Station Artists’ Studios (FSAS), Dublin, the Arts Council Ireland, The MART Gallery & Studios, and Dublin City Council.

About the Artists

Emma McKeagney is a Visual Artist based in Dublin. After graduating in 2017 from Dun Laoghaire IADT she completed a year-long residency at Talbot Studios after winning their Most Promising Graduate Award 2017. During this residency she fabricated work supported by the Sculpture Bursary Award at Fire Station Artists’ Studios.

McKeagney’s practice involves working closely with material processes to create bodies of work which incorporate the idea that a process is made up of not only the artist but the material they use and the impending idea of exhibiting. Reading and discussing various topics related to New Materialism, her interest starts with collapsing any hierarchy which puts humans ahead of all other materiality.

McKeagney had her first solo-show in June entitled Unstable Categories as part of Pallas Projects and Studios’ Artist Initiated Programme. Work selected from her solo-show is presented in this exhibition and developed further through new video works is a second phase of the project.

This work aims to blur the lines between the designed and natural worlds and question the emphasis we have on dividing these categories. What is human, is a malleable category which bends and stretches depending on the objects and minerals we are oriented between.

www.emmamckeagney.com

Èanna Heavey graduated from CIT Crawford College of Art & Design with a BA in Fine Art in June 2018. “I’m Sorry I was Not Here…” explores the distorted development of self through false education, institutional structures and the ideologies of Western culture.

Interwoven into this narrative is the idea of sexuality as a core element of the human experience. The work touches on the issue of insufficient sex education within Ireland. There are some uncomfortable undertones; suggesting at what has been unsaid, unseen or unheard.The unravelling of self is an important element of the work. There is a sense of fragility; a fragile strength longing for the return to innocence, searching for freedom.

Sarah Diviney graduated from CIT Crawford College of Art & Design with a BA(hons) in Fine Art. The work in this exhibition ‘I, X’ comprises of an installation consisting of a performance piece and a video work. It investigates the authority of the Church and State within the private realm, documenting the intimacy of the domestic sphere and the position of Irish women in society.

The work explored the dangerous axis of the female body as object, amplifying this through the chosen mediums of performance and video, with the performance space acting as a developing installation. Simultaneously, the work occupies the body as a moving sculpture due to the spectator relationship  between the audience and the work. The perturbed body licenses the unsettles tempo of the performance which transitions from meditative stillness to frantic action, disturbing the perceived tranquillity within the space and in turn, abruptly presenting the dystopia.

The work is an accumulation of influences by Sarah’s extensive research into the history of Irish women which generated the need for a confrontation medium to be used. The performance projects the concept into the present echoing the histories of Irish women.

www.sarahdivineyartist.wordpress.com

*Lectus – Latin word meaning selected, chosen, choice, good, exquisite

 




x
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Dissolution-rs.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Eidolon-rs.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Revelators-rs.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Scintilla-rs.jpg

Helen Mac Mahon




Visit : helenmacmahon.com

View: Artist CV | Artist Portfolio | Artist Reviews

Helen Mac Mahon is an Irish artist currently based in Dublin and exhibited in Ireland, Europe, the US and Asia. Her work takes the form of installations, sculpture and photography that explore light and perception.

“My practice is concerned primarily with the phenomena of light, movement, perception and space. The work strives to observe and reveal the ecosystem that exists between the viewer and these intangible elements that exist in a perpetual state of transformation. Changes occurring in each facet has a perceptible impact on others, revealing previously overlooked properties and characteristics.

My investigation of these elements is experimental in nature, and this exploratory process is as important as the finished piece, the unpredictability of the techniques often being key to discovery.  I use commonplace materials, such as light, glass, and lenses that have the potential to act in surprising ways, distorting and obscuring the very things it is their function to reveal. Each component acts as a catalyst, bringing to light unseen potential in the simplest of materials. Maintaining the integrity of the materials is also important, so the viewer is allowed to experience the everyday objects  in  new and often unexpected ways.”