Katherine Nolan – The Mistress of the Mantle



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MART curators Matthew Nevin & Ciara Scanlan are delighted to present the exhibition The Mistress of the Mantle by Katherine Nolan, kindly supported by The Arts Council of Ireland.

Preview: Thursday 2 March 2017 @ 6pm

Artist talk: Thursday 23 March 2017 @6.30pm

Location: The MART Gallery, 190A Rathmines Rd, Lwr, Dublin 6.

Runs to: 31 March 2017

Open: Tues-Sat: 1-6pm 

Hear Katherine Nolan Discuss her Exhibition on NEAR FM

The Mistress of the Mantle is an exhibition of video, photography and performance works that emerged in the context of the artist’s return home. Living in the UK for 10 years, and returning to a life in Ireland, the artist was struck both by a period of personal change, unexpected culture shock and generational difference. This set of artworks act as a means to examine the process of reintegration, and taken for granted socio-cultural attitudes that surface through this renegotiation of identity and gender in an Irish context.  As the artist attempts to re-find ‘home’, the self of the past and the present confront each other in crisis.  

A number of different forms of ‘returning home’ are performed: the literal act of finding and inhabiting of a home, revisiting sites of personal or cultural significance, and the (re)inhabiting of personal and cultural memories of womanhood. Clothing, sites, songs, role-models, relics and imagery and of femininities from a childhood in late seventies and early eighties, are accrued, layered, muddled and re-performed in the present. The artworks seem to examine the pleasures, pains, contradictions, catharsis, melodrama, narcissism, critique and mixed-emotions that arose while contemplating the spectre of becoming the models of womanhood observed in childhood. Through this examination of personal narrative in cultural context, the artist also stands as a proxy for her generation, in an Ireland wavering between its past and its present.   

Katherine Nolan Mistress of the Mantle




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Helen Mac Mahon




Visit : helenmacmahon.com

View: Artist CV | Artist Portfolio | Artist Reviews

Helen Mac Mahon is an Irish artist currently based in Dublin and exhibited in Ireland, Europe, the US and Asia. Her work takes the form of installations, sculpture and photography that explore light and perception.

“My practice is concerned primarily with the phenomena of light, movement, perception and space. The work strives to observe and reveal the ecosystem that exists between the viewer and these intangible elements that exist in a perpetual state of transformation. Changes occurring in each facet has a perceptible impact on others, revealing previously overlooked properties and characteristics.

My investigation of these elements is experimental in nature, and this exploratory process is as important as the finished piece, the unpredictability of the techniques often being key to discovery.  I use commonplace materials, such as light, glass, and lenses that have the potential to act in surprising ways, distorting and obscuring the very things it is their function to reveal. Each component acts as a catalyst, bringing to light unseen potential in the simplest of materials. Maintaining the integrity of the materials is also important, so the viewer is allowed to experience the everyday objects  in  new and often unexpected ways.”