/Glitch 2016



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/Glitch Festival : ‘Risk Assessment’

RUA RED & MART Galleries

May – June 2016

Ireland’s leading Digital Arts Festival that brought together artists utilising media and technology, hosted in two Dublin based galleries. RUA RED Gallery Tallaght & The Mart Gallery Rathmines.

/Glitch Festival 2016 was hosted in two Dublin based galleries. RUA RED Gallery Tallaght & The Mart Gallery Rathmines. Curators Ciara Scanlan and Matthew Nevin devised a risk based curatorial outline for an exhibition format with parameters, which the participating artists could work within or destroy. The festival focussed on live durational events and collaboration between digital and live processes.

The curators chose predominately female participants, performers and visual artists to make work exploring the notion of danger and risk within art making and society. The participants produced live experiential artworks and performances that evolved over the week of the festival. The curators created a stage for the artists to react to: a gallery ‘under construction’. Machinery and objects associated with building industry occupied the space ready for alteration, interaction and modifying their mechanics, aesthetics and behaviours.

The artworks were designed to react and interplay with this spectacle, andcreate interactive ‘dangerous & reactionary’ artworks, utilising engineering and arduino programming to enhance the user experience and interaction with the audience. The echoes of the collapse of the construction industry in Ireland created a society in fear of a repeat bubble already forming in the city. A hesitation to taking risks has meant many suburban and rural towns lay dormant, producing a culture of a ‘people in waiting’. For /Glitch 2016 the curators wanted to challenge this fear and become cultural risk activators, inviting artists who work under this umbrella to push the ‘safety’ of the gallery into a challenging experience for artists, curators and audience.

#glitch16

 

http://ruared.ie/event/glitch-festival

https://www.facebook.com/glitchfestival2016

 

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Helen Mac Mahon




Visit : helenmacmahon.com

View: Artist CV | Artist Portfolio | Artist Reviews

Helen Mac Mahon is an Irish artist currently based in Dublin and exhibited in Ireland, Europe, the US and Asia. Her work takes the form of installations, sculpture and photography that explore light and perception.

“My practice is concerned primarily with the phenomena of light, movement, perception and space. The work strives to observe and reveal the ecosystem that exists between the viewer and these intangible elements that exist in a perpetual state of transformation. Changes occurring in each facet has a perceptible impact on others, revealing previously overlooked properties and characteristics.

My investigation of these elements is experimental in nature, and this exploratory process is as important as the finished piece, the unpredictability of the techniques often being key to discovery.  I use commonplace materials, such as light, glass, and lenses that have the potential to act in surprising ways, distorting and obscuring the very things it is their function to reveal. Each component acts as a catalyst, bringing to light unseen potential in the simplest of materials. Maintaining the integrity of the materials is also important, so the viewer is allowed to experience the everyday objects  in  new and often unexpected ways.”