Curb Your Carrie Bradshawism



  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Mart_openingCarrieBrad201363.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Mart_openingCarrieBrad201321.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Mart_openingCarrieBrad201315.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Mart_openingCarrieBrad201312.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Mart_openingCarrieBrad201311.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Mart_openingCarrieBrad201373.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Mart_openingCarrieBrad201304.jpg

The Premiere Exhibition at The MART Gallery.

September 2013

 

Artists:
Alison Cronin, Amy Walsh, Andrew Carson, Andrew Healy, Anne O’Byrne, Aoife Giles, Camilla Fanning, Claire Nash, Cliona Harmey, Debbie Jenkinson, Eleanor Lawler, Emily Boylan, Gearoid O’Dea, Ida Mitrani, James L Hayes, Jessica Conway, Karen Tierney, Katherine Nolan, Michelle Hall, Moya Clarken, Niamh Hannaford, Olive Barrett, Orla Gilheany, Rebecca McGetrick, Seamus Bradley, Stephanie Golden, Terence Erraught.

Curated by Ciara Scanlan & Matthew Nevin.

THE MART, a new visual arts depot located in the iconic old fire station in Rathmines, Dublin, has been reappropriated to house multifarious elements, which include several galleries, an art shop, a workshop space and studios. MART seeks to position itself as a mediator of social and cultural transformation, through engagement with the arts. This dynamic venture will provide an accessible location and platform to develop and promote Irish and International contemporary visual art, one of the key principles fostered by MART.

This exhibition highlights the cycle of creativity beyond the confines of the gallery. Through a Fund-it campaign to raise resources for MART’s new premises, all contributors who invested in the initiative were invited to participate in the Curb your Carrie Bradshawism exhibition, in recognition of their support. This is a strong gesture and reflective of the inclusive nature of MART’s modus operandi. The realisation of this exhibition in this rejuvenated space sees the outcome of an exciting venture come full circle, culminating in the official launch of this new venue.

MART’s egalitarian ethos is echoed in the inaugural exhibition Curb your Carrie Bradshawism, as each participating artist will be given an identical challenge – to work within the constraints of a cardboard box, in any visual arts medium. As our culture is evolving into a society full of restrictions and limitations, artist’s struggle to find financial resources and opportunities to showcase their voice. The format of the exhibition and its established restrictions will generate an equal standing for each of the artist’s involved, without prejudice or favouritism.

The title of the exhibition Curb your Carrie Bradshawism, weighs heavily on contemporary material and cultural ideology. The all-pervading suffix, ‘ism’ has become commonplace and part of visual art pop culture. It enables the user to attain a certain gravity, or level of authenticity in their distinctive practice, philosophy or artistic movement in contemporary art. By initiating a response to the fad of ‘ism’, another layer is added to the prerequisite conditions imposed on the artist’s.

Impossible to ignore, Carrie Bradshaw becomes a focal point of the exhibitions title. Her character from Sex and the City, has become symbolic of consumerism, excess and materialism. Her happiness appears to be counted in material goods such as shoes, bags and couture clothes, in strict contrast to values and quality of life, and acts as an interesting foil to the realities of the artistic lifestyle. How would she survive the recession or economic hardship?

According to the philosopher Jacques Lacan, how somebody reads and interprets an artwork is determined in large by their subject position, as they inevitably project their own views on an object. To mirror this, another perspective worth considering is Carrie Bradshaw’s career as a journalist. Her character is established as possessor of ‘the gaze’, whose position involves objectifying situations to her individual perspective – highlighting the rupture between sight and gaze. A similar scrutiny will be undertaken by each of the artist’s involved in the exhibition, as they will be bringing their unique approach and individual interpretation to the fore as they create specific pieces. Despite the fact that the artist’s all have a common starting point, the final selection of artworks on display will differ significantly, both in composition and in their conceptual and philosophical deliberations – in stark contrast to the lite existential questions à la Carrie Bradshaw.

The use of cardboard boxes for each artwork is a confident, if unconventional method to provide unbiased, equal footing to every artist in the show. Yet, could it be argued that this scenario becomes symbolic of being somehow boxed-in? Or categorising the artist’s and their work – putting them into boxes, in a manner of speaking. The paradox of this construct is highlighted in the duality encapsulated by a seemingly neutral perspective, that when analysed may in fact be interpreted as including a somewhat judgemental element. These shifting concerns that are at play throughout the exhibition; the concept, the title, the symbolism and the display format, all combine to constantly challenge the perspectives of both artist and audience, as these fluctuating layers offer room for evolving interpretation.

Text by Rowan Sexton

2-web-New-Curb-Poster-01




x
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/1FOM-Banner.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/3FOM-banner.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/5FOM-Banner.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/wueste_001_42_X1_0014-Kopie-banner.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/wueste_001_61_X1_0002-Kopie-Banner.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Freedom-of-Movement-Nina-Fischer-Maroan-el-Sani-Photo-by-Seamus-Travers-4.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Freedom-of-Movement-Nina-Fischer-Maroan-el-Sani-Photo-by-Seamus-Travers-5.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Freedom-of-Movement-Nina-Fischer-Maroan-el-Sani-Photo-by-Seamus-Travers-6.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Freedom-of-Movement-Nina-Fischer-Maroan-el-Sani-Photo-by-Seamus-Travers-7.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Freedom-of-Movement-Nina-Fischer-Maroan-el-Sani-Photo-by-Seamus-Travers-9.jpg
  • http://www.mart.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Freedom-of-Movement-Nina-Fischer-Maroan-el-Sani-Photo-by-Seamus-Travers-10.jpg

Freedom of Movement




Freedom of Movement

Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani

Curated by Deirdre Morrissey supported by Directors Matthew Nevin & Ciara Scanlan.

The exhibition is kindly supported by The Arts Council of Ireland, an IMMA Production Residency, Goethe Institut Dublin and the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen.

Opening reception: Thurs 24 August 6pm – 8pm

Exhibition continues: 25 Aug – 22 Sept 2017

Gallery Open: Tues – Sat, 1pm -6pm

Closing event: Late Opening for Culture Night, Friday 22 September 2017 – 5-9pm

 

The MART Gallery’s curatorial vision for 2017 is to select artists who work under the parameters of risk and political agitation, creating powerful, informative and experimental work. We are delighted to present ‘Freedom of Movement’ an exhibition of film work by renowned German artists Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani.

MART first introduced the work of Fischer & el Sani to Ireland in 2014 when the artists presented film works ‘Narita Field Trip’ and ‘Spelling Dystopia’ in an exhibition curated by Barry Kehoe.  Both pieces were created when the artists were Associate Professors at the School of Art and Design in Sapporo City University in Japan and explored tensions that arise between the forces of globalisation and specific local narratives.

Always keen to build upon established relationships with international artists, MART has invited Fischer and El Sani back to Dublin for the presentation of two recent film installations ‘Identity’s Rule of Three’ (2015) and ‘Freedom of Movement’ (2017) These films pose questions on various aspects of human identity and society, the limits of geographical, artistic and social structure, and race relations.

Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani are visual artists and directors who have worked collaboratively since the 1990s and both live and work in Berlin. Through their work they have explored narratives in various sites around the world juxtaposing hidden histories with the lived experiences of contemporary society and questioning cultural perspectives

Fischer & el Sani have participated in numerous international exhibitions, including Seoul Media City Bienniale (2014, 2012), Aichi Triennale (2013), Curitiba Biennale (2013), the Istanbul Biennale (2007), the Gwangju Biennale (2008, 2002, 1995), the Sydney Biennale (2002), Manifesta 4, Frankfurt (2002), Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art (1999).

Their solo shows have been hosted by, among others: Maxxi Museum, Rome (2017), K21 – Kunstsammlung NRW, Düsseldorf (2016), MART, Dublin (2014), Museu de Arte Moderna Aloisio Magalhães, Recife (2013), the Berlinische Galerie – Museum of Modern Art, Berlin (2012), the Austin Museum of Art – Arthouse, Austin (2012), the Hiroshima Museum of Contemporary Art (2010), the Cobra Museum, Amstelveen (2010), Kunsthaus Glarus (2009), the Stedelijk Museum Bureau, Amsterdam (2007), Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media (2005), Metropolitan Museum of Photography, Tokyo (1998)

Identity’s Rule of Three

HD, colour, stereo, 20 min., 2015

An an­i­mated film that seizes the highly controversial de­bate around the planned pre­sen­ta­tion of eth­no­log­i­cal col­lec­tions in the re­con­structed Berlin City Cas­tle as an op­por­tu­nity to en­vi­sion a dif­fer­ent fu­ture. Play­ful and yet se­ri­ous, it ex­plores ques­tions of au­then­tic­ity and iden­tity of the in­di­viduum, art, ar­chi­tec­ture and so­ci­ety.

Identity’s  Rule of Three is a collaborative work of Nina Fischer, Maroan el Sani and Bertold Stallmach.

Freedom of Movement

3 chan­nel video in­stal­la­tion, HD, 9:45 min, 2017

Evok­ing the Olympic marathon from Rome 1960, in which the Ethiopian Abebe Bik­ila con­quered the African con­ti­nent’s first gold medal, run­ning bare­foot and be­com­ing a sport­ing leg­end and a sym­bol of an Africa that is free­ing it­self of colo­nial­ism, Fis­cher & el Sani have re­con­tex­tu­alised amidst Rome’s ra­tio­nal­ist ar­chi­tec­ture, a new race in­volv­ing refugees and im­mi­grants stak­ing a claim to their “free­dom of move­ment”, also un­der­stood as the pos­si­bil­ity of being welcomed in an­other coun­try.