Can You Hear Me Now?



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MART are delighted to present the exhibition Can You Hear Me Now? kindly supported by Crawford College and The Arts Council of Ireland. The exhibtion is presented as part of the annual Crawford Graduate Award. Mentorship by Livestock.

Preview: Thursday 2 November 2017 @6pm
Location: The MART Gallery, 190A Rathmines Rd, Lwr, Dublin 6
Runs to: 1 December 2017
Open: Tues-Sat: 1-6pm

Artists: Enid Conway, Elena Sawczenko, Thomas Spencer, Chloe Tetrault.

Performance with Livestock for Dublin Gallery Weekend: Saturday 25 November 3-6pm.

In the inaugural year of the Crawford Graduate Award Show at MART Gallery, Can You Hear Me Now showcases Crawford College graduates working specifically in performance based practice.  The exhibition unifies the work of four graduates work whose practices deal with concerns around identity, voice and the body.

Enid Conway explores how language is used by women to communicate and express themselves. Similar to games, functioning by conceptual rules known by the users, language is a construction that needs to be learned. Through a series of audio recordings of women telling mundane yet intimate stories, Conway examines the relationship between image verses word and how women express their inner worlds using this system.

Thomas Spencer utilises humour and irony in video performative works to evoke a sense of anxiety, excitement and liberation. Through intense media based experimentation, using stop motion techniques together with endurance based performance, Spencer is attempting to understand the reasons behind repressed actions.

Chloe Tetrault Kearney’s  practice is influenced by the philosophies and ideas of the Medieval alchemical tradition and the neoplatonic revival of the middle ages. The concerns of which were the mind-body problem, the unity of opposing forces and the reconciliation of dualism, as seen through the lense of the natural world. . The artist proposes the work as a portrait of  embodied experience; of existing simultaneously as a corporeal being and a conscious observer.

Elena Sawczenko uses video and sound to create installations based on the transformation of sound from an aural experience into a visual/visceral one. As a natural compensation for losing her hearing, Elena has had to rely on developing other senses to fill the void left by permanent silence. Even though she is deaf, sound  plays a major role in her life,  having to interpret this in different ways to hearing people.

 




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Dragons of Eden | Aoibheann Greenan & Terence Erraught




MART curators Matthew Nevin & Ciara Scanlan are delighted to present Dragons of Eden, an exhibition featuring Aoibheann Greenan and Terence Erraught, with thanks to Arts Council Ireland and Dublin City Council.

Preview: Thursday 15 June 2017 @ 6pm

Location: The MART Gallery, 190A Rathmines Rd, Lwr, Dublin 6.

Runs to: 13 July 2017

Open: Tues-Sat: 1-6pm 

Facebook Photo Gallery 

 

‘Dragons of Eden’ featuring work by Aoibheann Greenan {Gallery 1} and Terence Erraught {Gallery2} addresses mythological and real world societal challenges. The curators invited the artists to produce work that can provoke the limitations of the gallery environment, producing informative and experimental new work that can tease out radical ways of viewing and perceiving our culture and society. Greenan and Erraught have responded here with powerful creations that take on alternative perspectives on gender representation via symbols and icons of ancient cultures experienced through a schema of digital means.

Aoibheann Greenan presents The Eighth Seal, an installation and audio piece prompted by the Repeal the 8th movement and the ongoing struggle of Irish Women over the right to bodily autonomy. A radio interview reimagines the origins of Sheela na Gigs, ancient carvings scattered throughout Ireland depicting figures with exposed vulvas. Eschewing the tendency to interpret the Sheela through patriarchal narratives, the work proposes the symbol as both a harbinger of emancipation and metaphor for resistance. Esoteric and posthumanist motifs permeate the work, echoing the historical link between radical speculative fiction and movements for social change. The installation conjures a site for gathering, a space for consciousness raising, for invoking, for conspiring.

Terry Erraught’s work explores the masculine agenda of the contemporary artwork by addressing audiences increasingly desensitization of socio-political heinous events. In an era of instant digital media distribution, brutal violence appears to have become part of our daily routine, with audiences becoming increasingly indifferent. By engaging with mainstream media but using a primitive, ritualistic approach, Erraught attempts to connect with world events as they occur and enter our psyche. ‘Composition’ is a durational digital video painting, rather than an episodic performance, which contains references to multiple catastrophic events in recent times. Through a recognisable mythological and art historical aesthetic, the artist draws on his own personal experiences by physically manifesting into each of the constituent characters and situations in the video work. This can also be seen in Erraught’s second piece Saturn (The world revolves around me) which is a smaller installation or 3D painting recorded from a live performance. It is heavily influenced by Goya’s black paintings which portray Goya’s embittered attitude toward mankind, and struggles with panic, fear and hysteria specifically ‘Saturn Devouring his Son 1820-23’.

Dragons of Eden MART Gallery